Chipper Jones Will Get My Vote For The Hall

An article by posted on March 23, 2012

Some opponents you loathe. You watch with venom in your heart for how they destroy your team, for their arrogance and attitude.

Other opponents you respect and admire, and salute for their longevity and talent. Such is the case with the Braves’ Chipper Jones.

The inevitable became official this morning when Jones announced this would be his final season playing third base for Atlanta, and by extension, tormenting the Mets.

Jones will be one of the rare few players, something I hoped would be the case with David Wright and Jose Reyes, to play his entire career with one team.

I covered both Cal Ripken and Derek Jeter through the prime of their careers, and respected what they accomplished. Both had opportunities to leave for more money, but recognized the importance they represented to their team and cities. They were special players.

They are nothing like today’s spoiled players in the NBA. They kept their talents at home, as did Don Mattingly and Kirby Puckett. It was a shame it wasn’t the case with Tom Seaver and Reyes. I thought Albert Pujols had a chance. I hope it isn’t that way with Wright.

Jones thought about retirement two years ago, but changed his mind. Now, after 18 years and a string of injuries the past two seasons, there’s no longer fighting time.

Early in camp, Jones told reporters: “Never in my mid-20s would I have given myself a snowball’s chance to be in camp and have a job at 40 years old. But I like to think I’ve kept myself in pretty good shape over the years. The skills are still there to go out and get it done. I don’t know for how much longer, but we’re gonna ride it as long as we can.’’

I wish for him a full and healthy season, one with numbers that will have him leaving with pride and not frustration. A season in which he would end exhausted with satisfaction and no regrets.

It was obvious watching Jones the past two years that he slowed. You could tell his range was declining and he wasn’t the same on the bases. Still, when he came to the plate in the late innings, he was showed respect from the Mets’ pitchers.

Since 2004, Jones underwent two knee operations and dealt with several other nagging issues that deprived him of 500 homers – he would have been the third Brave to reach the milestone, joining Hank Aaron and Eddie Mathews – which has been an automatic ticket to the Hall of Fame.

Jones, the 1999 NL MVP, joins Mickey Mantle and Eddie Murray as among the games’ greatest switch hitters, which is an unappreciated skill. Jones takes a .304 career average, 454 homers and 1,561 RBI into this season.

There is no reason to believe Jones’ numbers are steroid induced. Of his 454 homers, 91 came in August and 74 in September, during the heat of the pennant race; 213 were hit in the seventh inning with the Braves tied, ahead by one, or had the tying run on deck.

And, against the Mets, Jones’ numbers would have represented a MVP season: He hit 48 homers, with 154 RBI and a .318 career average.

He hit 19 homers at Shea, which is what he named his son. Any player who would name his child after Shea Stadium is worthy of a salute. I hope you all give him one this summer.

I’ve covered well over a two thousand baseball games, and as a reporter found Jones to be accommodating and thoughtful. His appreciation for the fundamentals and ability to perform under pressure made him a privilege to watch.

Some day, I’ll get to say I saw Chipper Jones, Hall of Famer. As a lifetime member of the BBWAA, he’ll get my vote.

Check out my work in the upcoming MMO 2012 Mets Annual which goes On Sale April 1 at Amazon.com, the Apple ITunes Store and Barnes and Noble.

About the Author ()

I am an active member of the BBWAA and have covered Major League Baseball in several capacities for over 20 years, including ten in New York working the Mets' and Yankees' beat. I covered the Baltimore Orioles for eight years and the Cleveland Indians before that. Today I am a freelance writer and social director for several media outlets and the Senior Editor for MetsmerizedOnline.com.

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