They Are All To Blame…

An article by posted on October 2, 2007
Who do we blame exactly?
Perhaps the most puzzling questions being swirled around the fall winds of Flushing are not that of who Omar Minaya should keep and who should be shipped to Osh Gosh for a bag of balls. Rather they are centered on responsibility… and who indeed is accountable for the demise of the New York Mets.
 
I for one have begun my long grueling journey back from the despair and tragedy that brought me to my knees and sent my heart to its breaking point on that lowly Sunday afternoon. The same Sunday in which the Phillies were invited to dance in October, while the Mets invitation, was lost in the mail. You can blame managers, coaches, GM’s, owners, but when the push comes to the shove, accountability lies squarely on the shoulders of the nine men on the diamond.
 
Blame Tom Glavine, not just for his gutless effort on Sunday, but also for his two putrid outings prior to that against Washington and Florida. Blame El Duque for being El Duque. He always manages to injure his ancient body at the most crucial of stretches. Because of his trip to the disabled list in the nightmare that was September, Brian Lawrence and Phil Humber were unfairly thrust into roles that demanded they flourished in, and as we all know now, they were just not up to the task.
 
Maybe it was Carlos Delgado for swinging at anything and everything all season long. Blame Guillermo Mota for well, not having a syringe anymore. Blame Billy Wagner for blowing five games in the final six weeks of the season, those games alone would have secured the Mets the NL East crown, instead it now sits atop of a green monster who rides around on an off road 4×4 called the Phanatic.

Aside from Glavine, I think the player most responsible for the unfathomable collapse of the not so Amazins is none other than Jose Reyes. The supposed franchise player and larger than life superstar, yes, that Jose Reyes.
 
Jimmy Rollins did what Jose Reyes was supposed to do. I can no longer acclaim Reyes as the best shortstop in the league, or the division for that very matter. This was supposed to be the year that set Reyes aside from all other shortstops, and in a sense would have made him an immortal, top flight talent. Instead, he succeeded in being the poster boy for the biggest collapse in the games illustrious history.
 
Certainly Willie is no Einstein making strategical moves, but his employment by the Mets should not be terminated because a team of pompous, arrogant, complacent players that got too full of themselves. They thought they were better than the Phillies, and everyone else for that matter, but the fact is they had no heart. It was as if they thought, “We’re the Mets, of course were going to make the playoffs.” However, when the bell tolled they cracked under pressure, and that is just inexcusable.
 
"Frustrating, Disappointing, and Depressing, The 2007 Mets." That would have been a more fitting marketing slogan than “Your Season Has Come.” All faithful followers of the Metropolitans are still waiting, and wondering if that season will ever arrive. 

I would hesitate to even call the Mets a team… on the field, they appeared to be anything but. As they slugged, they failed to pitch and field, when their pitchers threw gems, they chucked up goose eggs.

The Mets did nothing but underachieve this season, and Mets nation is up in arms because of it, and rightfully so.

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