Beat Writer Apologizes For Mocking Bartolo Colon

An article by posted on April 30, 2014 0 Comments

lardball

April 29

New York Post beat writer Mike Puma, whose comments about Bartolo Colon caused Mets players to boycott his presence in the clubhouse, apologized today via Twitter.

“No intent to offend with Colon comment last week, was meant to be a joke. For the record, I keep hot fudge on my neck for long games.”

If the rain stops, Colon will be on the mound tonight in Philadelphia with the Mets looking for a two-game sweep .

April 26

The Mets would not speak with the media after their exciting walk-off win on Friday night until NY Post beat writer Mike Puma left the clubhouse.

Kristie Ackert of the Daily News, dished out the details:

Instead of a jubilant clubhouse with loud music and happy players after Friday’s walk-off win, the doors opened to silence, empty, spinning chairs and no Mets.

Apparently angry about an article in the New York Post on Friday about Bartolo Colon under the headline “LARDBALL,” the players would not talk to the media until Post writer Mike Puma left the clubhouse. Puma was asked to leave and did so without incident. Within a minute, several Mets appeared in the clubhouse.

Puma began that article:

“If the umpires searched Bartolo Colon’s neck for a foreign substance on Thursday, chances are they only would have found peanut butter.”

That’s pretty unprofessional for a writer being paid to cover the Mets beat and report the news to fans. And an awful oversight by the editors at the Post for allowing that article to go public like that. Bad job all around…

Kudos to David Wright and all the other leaders in the Mets clubhouse for taking note of Puma’s article and then taking a stand to defend one of their own teammates in a silent protest.

I’m very proud of this team which continues to take the concept of teamwork to a whole new level, both on and off the field.

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I'm a lifelong Mets fan who loves writing and talking about the Amazins' 24/7. From the Miracle in 1969 to the magic of 1986, and even the near misses in '73 and '00, I've experienced it all - the highs and the lows. I started Mets Merized Online in 2005 to feed my addiction and interact with other passionate Met fans like you. Follow me on Twitter @metsmerized.