DePo Discusses Innings Cap On Syndergaard

noah_syndergaard

Mets VP of Player Development Paul DePodesta told reporters that Noah Syndergaard will be permitted somewhere in the vicinity of a 30-inning increase over last season’s total which will put him roughly at a 150-155 innings cap.

“A lot of it’s going to be on how he actually racks up those innings — how efficient he is in the pitch counts, how much rest he’s getting between starts, how much side work we do with him. But, as a general marker, that’s roughly fair.”

Adam Rubin has the full story on ESPN New York.

The Mets may try to conserve his innings by skipping an occasional start and capping his outings at 60 pitches.

DePo didn’t rule out the possibility of Syndergaard pitching in relief for the Mets, stating that such a decision was above his pay grade.

“That’s not my call, ultimately,” DePodesta said. “There are certain guys that I would say we’re more open to it than others. But, again, ultimately that’s not my decision.”

Syndergaard drew rave reviews a couple of days ago from Mets brass, coaches, scouts, and media alike when they all gathered to catch a glimpse of the hard-throwing righthander as he tossed his first bullpen of the Spring.

Thor was hitting 97 mph consistently with some great late life on fastball, that’s some very high octane for his first 40 pitches of spring training. But it was his curveball which wowed onlookers and prompted manager Terry Collins to call it “the hook from hell.”

With all the hype and fanfare for Thor this offseason, all of it well-deserved, it was amazing to see him take the mound and justify all of it with such a dazzling bullpen session.

What a steal… Hearts are breaking all over the Toronto area…

About Joe D 7843 Articles
I'm a lifelong Mets fan who loves writing and talking about the Amazins' 24/7. From the Miracle in 1969 to the magic of 1986, and even the near misses in '73, '00 and '15, I've experienced it all - the highs and the lows. I started Mets Merized Online in 2005 to feed my addiction and interact with other passionate Met fans like you. Follow me on Twitter @metsmerized.
  • Metsaholic

    The called Dwight Goodens curve ball “Lord Charles.” Thors, “The Hook from Hell.” Awesome!

  • ThatGuyWhoLeavesComments

    If Syndergaard is as advertised, it will be Sandy’s signature move as GM.

  • Metsaholic

    Absolutely agree, and we can add TDA to that mixed on a very fair trade of a C.Y. winner in R.A.

  • ThatGuyWhoLeavesComments

    Haha. Well, if Syndergaard pitches for us for 10 years, it’s awfully lopsided in our favor.

  • Metsaholic

    If he has one year like Gooden, with a championship thrown in, I can live with that.

  • Hodges14

    Wonder what Mejia’s innings limit is? He only threw 57 innings last year. Do they allow him to double that? Or is he allowed roughly 30 more than last year like Syndergaard? Last year Syndergaard threw 118 innings, Mejia has never reached 95 in a season. Difficult to manage these scenarios. I’d hate to see the Mets taking a starting pitcher out of the game after an arbitrary pitch count if he’s cruising, only to go on and lose the game. It also wreaks havoc on the bullpen to have to pick up all those extra innings.

  • ThatGuyWhoLeavesComments

    Maybe that’s their thinking with Mejia not being handed the fifth spot in the rotation?

  • Hodges14

    It’s definitely a consideration if they’re only going to let him pitch 100 innings this season. Maybe he starts the season on the DL “recovering” from off season arm surgery.

  • ThatGuyWhoLeavesComments

    Haha. No. I think he’ll either make the rotation or wind up in AAA and be the first option if someone gets hurt/gets cut.

  • CJM

    He will start the season pitching, not on the DL. The only way to 1) get better at pitching and 2) develop stamina as a pitcher is to pitch. He has already received an extended break from the surgery. The best thing for him is to pitch and get consistent work in.

  • Hodges14

    Thing is, if he’s throwing innings in AAA that’s going to count against his total just like major league innings would. So I’m not sure that helps. I think it might just be better to delay his season a bit and have him start pitching in June and let him use his 100 innings up in the summer.

  • Hodges14

    So then you figure they’ll shut him down in July when he reaches 100 innings?

  • CJM

    That or he’ll be throwing from the bullpen.

  • Hodges14

    Not sure how that helps Mejia or the Mets. If he can only go 100 innings I”d personally like to see him do it so that he is pitching at the end of the season so that he has a normal off season to prepare for 2015. If he starts this season and is shut down by the end of July, that’s an awful long inactive period before spring training again.

  • CJM

    If he pitches from the bullpen I imagine it would be on a relatively set schedule, and then he can do the same type of work he’d do preparing as a starter, only he’d preserve his innings by throwing from the pen. That way it would feel like a full season, and he’d get a full season of side sessions, even though he wouldn’t be starting. Then approach the off season like any other off season. But I think the most important thing for Mejia is to get back to pitching, especially because before last year, control was always an issue. Get him throwing consistently.

  • ThatGuyWhoLeavesComments

    So you want to have him sit around and do nothing until June?

    At least in AAA he can pitch five innings and come out with no real pressure to push himself. I’d prefer he come up with the team as a starter at the end of ST but I don’t know what’ll happen.

  • Hodges14

    I think he’s either going to sit now, April and May or sit later August and September. Since he’s coming off surgery I don’t think waiting a bit now is a bad option.

  • RyanF55

    Good point on Mejia….unlike Syndergaard and Montero, he has a real good chance of winning the 5th spot outright out of ST. Will he only be able to pitch half the season before getting shut down? Innings limits are the nature of the game today, unfortunately.

  • Hodges14

    Even with Syndergaard and Montero, the innings they throw in Vegas count against their limit for the season. It’s all going to come down to how many of those innings do you want them throwing a the major league level. Or in this case, how many innings do you want them to have left to throw at the major league level after the Super 2 date passes.

  • Destry

    At some point these GMs are gonna have to start thinking about delaying spring training for the young pitchers that are on innings limits. If Syndergaard is gonna throw 145, then bring him to St. Lucie towards the end of spring training and let him stay in extended spring training to get ready for the season in April, and he can join the AAA rotation May 1st. He can pitch May, June, and they first part of July in AAA, and join the Mets rotation after the All-Star break. He would still pitch the same amount of total innings, the same amount of AAA innings, and the same amount of major league innings. The only difference is that he would be pitching in September for the Mets & sitting in April, instead of pitching April in AAA, and sitting in September when we most likely will need an extra arm or two.

  • RyanF55

    What are the options, though. Limit them to 4 innings a start in the minors to save them for the majors? I guess it is what it is, but every time they take the mound be it in Vegas or Flushing, I want them to pitch deep into games and learn to go into the 7th and beyond.

  • Peter S

    Pitch limits and counts are ridiculous. See Nolan Ryan and then go look how Washington handled Strasburg. If I was running a team I would get as much out of these pitchers at a young age as I could. Those arms are ticking time bombs, and are not worth the 7 year contracts. Just look at CC, they pitched him to death for 4 years and now are paying the price. Should have never renegotiated his contract and let him move on.

  • gameball

    I can easily see teams—especially those in contention for the postseason—deciding to delay the start of the season for top pitching prospects:

    Extended spring training in April, two AAA tuneup starts in May, three in June—about 35-40 innings total. Then up to the majors for 90-100 innings (a full workload) in the second half of the season.

    That would have to be better—both for the team and for the player—than shutting a kid down in August when the team is possibly in the middle of a pennant race.

  • vigouge

    If he can only go 100 innings then let him go 100 innings as soon as possible. If he sits until mid season and then pulls a muscle and misses more time then he won’t have a chance to get 100 innings in.

  • vigouge

    Limit them to 4 innings a start in the minors to save them for the majors?

    You don’t limit to conserve for the majors, you limit to get that player to pitch the entire season rather than being shut down in mid August. The majors is irrelevant for Syndergaard, it’s purely about his development.

  • Hodges14

    So he pitches till mid season then sits down for 7 months? How is that any better?

  • Hodges14

    I sure hope the majors aren’t irrelevant. I’d expect Syndergaard to be pitching in the majors this year. I’d like him to have some success.

  • Hodges14

    Start their season later. I do agree I want pitchers that go deep into games so I wouldn’t want to limit them to 4 or 5 innings per start.

  • Taskmaster4450

    It is good to have something to look forward to but Met fans are going to have to be patient. Noah will be in Flushing soon enough. Sure it is later than some want but he will arrive. Just like Harvey and Wheeler the past two seasons, the time does roll around. Sadly Harvey is out this year but we do have a full season of Wheeler coming up. Hopefully he takes a big step forward as compared to where he was last season.

    Besides, before Noah arrives we will have an opportunity to root for Montero.

  • RyanF55

    “The majors is irrelevant for Syndergaard, it’s purely about his development.’ …um what? He’s going to be here in the mid Summer

  • Hodges14

    I heard Ron Darling say pretty much the same thing last summer. He said you’re looking at a 6 – 7 year window. Don’t waste it in the minors and don’t put innings limits on it because the window closes at the same time regardless.

  • joeythew

    The only drawback to capping his outings at 60 pitches or 5 innings is he never builds up the endurance to go 7 let alone 9 innings. This training mindset just puts a burden on the Major League bullpen.

  • vigouge

    Because it increases the likelihood that he’ll get 100 innings in. Holding him for a few months is just procrastination, what if he pulls his hamstring in May and is out until August? Then he won’t get his innings in.

    If he starts his season on Opening Day and hits his innings limit July 1st, good. He’ll then get a nice rest for a month or two before starting the typical offseason strength and conditioning program slightly early which will also enable him to pitch in winter ball to shake off some rust.

    The next 100 innings are up until now the most important of his career. He needs to get them done and he needs to get through them without injury. Once he does that a plan to take him from July/August to spring training can then be developed, but he has to do them first. Get them over and done with before worrying about anything past that and if he’s capable of doing that on April 1st then that’s when he needs to start his season.

  • Metropolitan

    still no scientific evidence that innings limits prevents injury

  • vigouge

    You hope. He’s got 54 innings above A ball, he’s 20 going on 21, and there’s 2 other players that are closer to graduating to the majors than him. Let him get his work done in AAA first before worrying about when to call him up.

  • vigouge

    I care more about Syndergaards overall development than whatever he does in the majors this year. He’s going to be 21 this season, I’ll be happy with a cup of coffee in september.

  • vigouge

    He’ll build up endurance it just won’t be this year. Right now he’s where Montero was last year and Wheeler the year before. It’ll take 2 years from this point to get the pitcher to the point where they’ll be without limits and hopefully be able to go ~100-110 pitches and 200+ innings.

    Plus you can always look at it this way, with a occasional stricter pitch limit it can hopefully force the pitcher to be more economical and get through batters quicker which will serve them well in a few years when they need to know how to get quick innings in order to go 7, 7 1/3rd rather than 6 2/3rds.

  • BadBadLeroyBrown

    Hope they dont pull that 5inning cap crap with this kid….Thats not how you build a kids arm up…its counterproductive…Id rather him pitch and if he reaches his innings cap shut him down for the year