With Things Deteriorating Quickly In Miami, Is A Reyes Reunion Possible?

An article by posted on September 25, 2012

Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria was reportedly outraged with Braves manager Fredi Gonzalez’s comments in which he told the Miami Herald the following:

“There’s not a manager dead or alive that Jeffrey thinks is good enough. Not Connie Mack, not anyone.”

Gonzalez managed the Marlins for five seasons including their last two winning teams, in 2008 and 2009. He was fired in June 2010, after the team got off to a 34-36 start.

Loria responded, “I’m a little surprised because it’s classless — and you can quote me — especially because he was with us for five years and he was a colossal failure.”

These comments came only two days after current Marlins manager Ozzie Guillen openly blasted the owner on Friday at Citi Field:

“If Jeffrey doesn’t think I’m doing the job I should do, it’s not the first time he’s fired a manager,” Guillen said. “Look yourself in the mirror and ask why so many (bleeping) managers come through here. When you are in last place…we all failed.”

Things are falling apart quickly in Miami and reports are now coming out that the team has lost money this season even with the new (and ugly) park.

The Herald says that payroll could be slashed to as low as $70 million and with $65.5 million already committed in 2013 to eight players, more big names could be moved in salary dump deals. Those players could include Josh Johnson $13.75M, Mark Buehrle $12M, Ricky Nolasco $11.5M, Jose Reyes $10M, Heath Bell $9M, and John Buck $6.5M.

It’s a silly thought, but wouldn’t it be great if we could swap Jason Bay and his $16 million for Jose Reyes’ and Mark Buehrle’s contracts?

Move Ruben Tejada back to second base, have a 100% healthy Jose Reyes back at short and leading off again for us coming after another great season. And adding a veteran pitcher like Buehrle to the rotation would be something. The best part is losing Bay.

In case you were wondering, Reyes has played 151 games this season. He’s batting .286/.345/.435 with 35 doubles, 11 triples, 11 home runs, 82 runs scored, 59 RBI and 36 stolen bases in 605 at-bats.

The Marlins have never been a team that doesn’t like to trade within their division, in fact they do so more than most.

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I'm a lifelong Mets fan who loves writing and talking about the Amazins' 24/7. From the Miracle in 1969 to the magic of 1986, and even the near misses in '73 and '00, I've experienced it all - the highs and the lows. I started Mets Merized Online in 2005 to feed my addiction and interact with other passionate Met fans like you. Follow me on Twitter @metsmerized.

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