From Left Field: Mets Dominate Opening Day Historically

An article by posted on April 5, 2012

Based on the Mets 50-year history of mostly losing records, trends would normally dictate that the team would have a losing record on Opening Day.

However, it’s the complete opposite. The Mets have a 30-20 record in the season’s first game—a .600 winning percentage.

Maybe there’s just something about Opening Day that gets the team amped. But actually, the Mets lost their first six Opening Days and eight of their first nine.

Starting in 1971 though, the Mets rattled off a streak of eight consecutive Opening Day wins. They would up winning 12-of-13 starting that year.

So if you take away the first nine years of existence, the Mets have a 29-12 record—a .707 clip.

Compare that number to the Mets all-time record of 3,811-4,149 (.479) and there is definitely something to be said about the team’s performance on Opening Day.

Hopefully, that trend continues today as the Mets take on the Braves. If Johan Santana can keep the team in the game through six innings, maybe the offense can muster an attack against Atlanta starter Tommy Hanson.

If history serves us, there’s a 60 percent chance the Mets win today. Now they just need to win some other games throughout the season to try to improve the .479 mark.

Numbers aside, baseball is back! Get excited!

About the Author ()

Jim Mancari hails from Massapequa, N.Y. He recently earned a Master's degree in Journalism at Hofstra University. He is a devout Mets fan and takes pride in his team, despite their lack of success over the last few years. Like all Mets fans, Jim has plenty of hope. He also writes as the sports reporter for the Brooklyn Tablet newspaper and the senior editor of metroBASEBALL Magazine. Click my name to view my personal website.

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