Fire Sale In Oakland? A’s Ready To Move Anyone Including Starters Cahill and Gonzalez

An article by posted on November 5, 2011

According to Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports, the Oakland Athletics are in a holding pattern as they await word on whether they can relocate to San Jose. They are also considering a total makeover of their roster.

The team is considering going totally young again and restocking the minors, accumulating draft picks and trading established players for prospects.

They are already parting ways with their entire outfield of Coco Crisp, Josh Willingham and David DeJesus who are all free agents and will not be re-signed.

Rosenthal says “they are open to trade offers for anyone on the roster with the exception of second baseman Jemile Weeks”, according to major-league sources.

The A’s aren’t shopping any of their players, sources say. But they will listen on pitchers such as left-hander Gio Gonzalez and righty Trevor Cahill, both of whom could be in demand in a thin market for starters. Catcher Kurt Suzuki also could be in play.

I’m not sure how much truth there is to this, but I’m thinking Sandy Alderson should give his old protege Billy Beane a call, and as they say in marine-speak, on the double!

Gonzalez, 26, is 31-21 with a 3.17 ERA, 8.2 strikeouts per nine innings and 4.1 walks per nine over the last two years; he has pitched over 200 innings in both of the last two years, and made the All-Star team in 2011. He is arbitration-eligible for the first time this offseason, and won’t be eligible for free agency until after the 2014 season.

Cahill will begin a four-year, $30 million deal in 2012 that includes team options for both the 2016 and 2017 seasons. Cahill is 40-35 with a 3.91 ERA in three seasons, but after going 18-8 with a 2.97 ERA in 2010, he slipped to marks of 12-14 with a 4.16 ERA in 2011, a year in which his walk rate went up to 3.6 per nine innings.

Getting either of these pitchers would be a huge upgrade for the Mets rotation. It might take some of our good prospects, but good pitching doesn’t come cheap.

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